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Frequently Asked Questions

General Questions

Questions About Recovery

Other Questions


Why the "plastic" in plastic surgery?

The word "plastic" in plastic surgery comes from the Greek word "plastikos" which means to mold or to shape. The specialty of plastic surgery dates back to 3000 BC when Indian surgeons reconstructed missing noses. The specialty has evolved to the field of reconstructive surgery replacing missing parts with natural or artificial materials, the closure of complex wounds, and aesthetic surgery.

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I am considering plastic surgery, what is the first step?

The First Step if you are considering plastic surgery is to select a surgeon you can trust. Choosing a surgeon who is a member of the American Society of Plastic Surgery (ASPS) will ensure you have selected a physician who:

  • Has completed at least five years of surgical training with a minimum of two years in plastic surgery.
  • Is trained and experienced in all plastic surgery procedures, including breast, body, face and reconstruction.
  • Operates only in accredited medical facilities.
  • Adheres to a strict code of ethics.
  • Fulfills continuing medical education requirements, including standards and innovations in patient safety.
  • Is board certified by the American Board of Plastic Surgery.

ASPS Member Surgeons are your partners in cosmetic and reconstructive plastic surgery.


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Ok, what is step two?

The Second Step is to know about the safety of outpatient surgery. When considering plastic surgery, it’s natural to focus more on the expected result than on the surgical process. However, to be fully informed, it’s important to learn about the safety of the procedure as well as the expected outcome. Although thousands of people have plastic surgery every year without complications, no surgical procedure is risk-free. To maximize safety, not only should you ensure that your physician is an ASPS member surgeon, you must be certain that the facility where your surgery will be performed conforms to strict safety standards and is an accredited facility. Look for the ASPS Member Surgeon Logo. Only ASPS members are entitled to display the logo found on the right side of this page.

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Is there a third step?

The Third Step is to let your surgeon know detailed information about your personal and family health history. There is always risk with any surgical procedure. However, as a patient, you can play an important role in reducing your risk by providing a full and complete health history to your surgeon. Although rare, one of the most serious complications associated with surgery is the development of blood clots in the large veins of the abdomen and legs. This complication can lead to a potentially fatal pulmonary embolism (blocked lung artery). Therefore, it is extremely important to tell your plastic surgeon if you or any of your family members have a history of blood clots or if you have had a family member who died suddenly, shortly after surgery or childbirth. You will be evaluated for other factors that may increase the risks of blood clots. These include:

  • Being extremely overweight
  • Having recent traumatic injury
  • Any disorder of the heart, lungs, or central nervous system
  • A history of cancer, recurrent severe infection or genetic problems that affect blood clotting
  • Taking oral contraceptives or having recently ceased taking them
  • Undergoing hormone-replacement therapy

Safety measures to prevent blood clots will be determined by your individual degree of risk.

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Will I be able to tolerate the pain?

Each patient will tolerate pain post-operatively in a different way, and we consider this. While some patients may describe the pain as an ache, others experience greater discomfort. Appropriate pain medications are prescribed for the post-operative patients, and these help minimize discomfort. Most facial cosmetic operations have minimal discomfort post-operatively. Liposuction is slightly more uncomfortable, and operations that require elevation or tightening of the muscles - such as an abdominoplasty or breast augmentation have discomfort equal to that of a C-section.

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How long is the recuperative period and when can I return to work?

The length of time it takes to recuperate after plastic surgery varies depending on the procedure performed and the person operated on. Most patients will require assistance for the first two days. Then most patients are able to care for themselves, but may still need assistance if they have small children to care for. The specific lengths of disability are outlined below by procedure. These are approximations, and do not include return to exercise.

  • Eyelid Surgery - Usually can get around independently by the second day. With the use of sunglasses, may feel comfortable going to the store by day 3-4, and with makeup could return to work by 5-7 days.
  • Facelift Surgery - Usually can get around independently by the second day. Usually do not feel comfortable going out in public for 5-7 days. Requires 10 - 14 days before returning to work if in the public eye.
  • Breast Surgery - Usually can get around independently by the second day. May return to work at 3-7 days if not required to lift more than 15 pounds.
  • Liposuction - Usually can get around independently by the second day, earlier if smaller number of areas are treated. One can return to work and normal activities in 5-7 days.
  • Abdominoplasty - Patients may take between 2-4 days before getting around independently. The recover is almost identical to C-section. One can return to a desk job at 5-7 days, other jobs 10-14 days.


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When can I resume regular exercise?

The time a patient resumes regular exercises varies based on the operation performed. All patients are encouraged to start a slow walking routine on the second postoperative day. Regular aerobic and more vigorous activities are not allowed during the first 2 weeks in order to decrease the risks of bleeding, swelling, and bruising. Weight lifting and contact sports are allowed at 1 month in most cases.

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Are there any questions I need to ask my plastic surgeon?

Yes, absolutely. Below are some questions to ask your plastic surgeon:

  • Are you certified by the American Board of Plastic Surgery?
  • Were you trained specifically in the field of plastic surgery?
  • How many years of plastic surgery training have you had?
  • Do you have hospital privileges to perform this procedure?
  • Is the office-based surgical facility accredited by a nationally recognized accrediting agency?
  • Am I a good candidate for this procedure?
  • What will be expected of me to get the best results?
  • Where and how will you perform my procedure?
  • What surgical technique is recommended for me?
  • How long of a recovery period can I expect, and what kind of help will I need during my recovery?
  • What are the risks and complications associated with my procedure?
  • How are complications handled?
  • What are my options if I am dissatisfied with the cosmetic outcome of my surgery?
  • Do you have before-and-after photos I can look at for this procedure and what results are reasonable for me?


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PATIENT TESTIMONIAL


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Great experience!


03/08/17

Great experience.


01/12/17

I have great gratitude to all staff and Dr. Strinden.


11/16/16

Very satisfied...excellent team!


03/08/17

Very pleased with every staff member & every step of the surgery process.


02/02/17

Everything was great!!


01/23/17

Everything was explained clearly.


09/14/16

Great Job For all The Staff!


09/12/16

The entire staff has been nothing but extremely helpful.


01/23/17

A great experience by a fantastic group.


12/30/16

I was satisfied with every aspect of my care.


01/23/17

Overall, I'm very pleased with my 'new look'.


01/23/17





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